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Memorandum Circular No. 2016-05: Preparation and Online Submission of FY 2018 Gender and Development (GAD) Plans and Budgets and FY 2016 GAD Accomplishment eports and Other Matters

SOURCE : http://www.pcw.gov.ph/

Preparation and Online Submission of FY 2018 Gender and Development (GAD) Plans and Budgets and FY 2016 GAD Accomplishment Reports and Other Matters
Date

30 September 2016

To:

All Heads of Executive Departments, Agencies, Bureaus, Offices, State Universities and Colleges (SUCs), Government Owned and/or Controlled Corporations (GOCCs), Legislative and Judiciary Branches, Constitutional Bodies, Other Government Instrumentalities and All Others Concerned

Subject:  :

Preparation and Online Submission of FY 2018 Gender and Development (GAD) Plans and Budgets and FY 2016 GAD Accomplishment Reports and Other Matters

1.0    Preparation and Submission of FY 2018 GAD Plans and Budgets (GPBs) and FY 2016 GAD Accomplishment Reports (GAD ARs)

1.1.    In accordance with Section 36 of the Magna Carta of Women (MCW) and the guidelines set under Joint Circular 2012-01 issued by the Philippine Commission on Women (PCW), the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) and the Department of Budget and Management (DBM), the PCW calls on all government agencies for the early preparation and submission of their FY 2018 GPB and FY 2016 GAD AR.


WOMEN’S WEEK

DECLARING THE FIRST WEEK OF MARCH OF EVERY YEAR AS WOMEN’S WEEK AND MARCH 8, 1988 AND EVERY YEAR THEREAFTER AS WOMEN’S RIGHTS AND INTERNATIONAL PEACE DAY

WHEREAS, the U.N. General Assembly has approved by resolution the declaration of an International Women’s Day, said resolution having been approved on the 105th plenary meeting of 16 December, 1977;

WHEREAS, said resolution of the U.N. General Assembly invites all the States, in accordance with their historical and national traditions, to proclaim any day of the year as United Nations Day for Women’s Rights and International Peace;

WHEREAS, Filipino women have been active in the struggle for national independence, for civil liberties, for equality of the sexes, and for human rights; and

WHEREAS, it is but just and proper to declare a week and a particular day of the year as Women’s Rights and International Peace Day, in solidarity with the United Nations, and in commemoration of the struggle of Filipino women for national freedom, civil liberty, equality and human rights;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, CORAZON C. AQUINO, President of the Philippines, by virtue of the powers vested in me by law, do hereby declare the first week of March, of every year as Women’s Week and March 8, 1988 and every year thereafter as Women’s Rights and International Peace Day.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the Republic of the Philippines to be affixed. DONE in the City of Manila, this 1st day of March, in the year of Our Lord, Nineteen Hundred and Eighty-Eight.


CORAZON C. AQUINO
President of the Philippines


Republic Act 1564

AN ACT GRANTING MATERNITY LEAVE TO WOMEN IN GOVERNMENT SERVICE UNDER TEMPORARY APPOINTMENTS WHO HAVE RENDERED LESS THAN TWO YEARS OF SERVICE, BY AMENDING COMMONWEALTH ACT NUMBERED SIX HUNDRED AND FORTY-SEVEN AS AMENDED

Section 1.    Section one of Commonwealth Act Numbered Six hundred and forty-seven, as amended, is further amended by adding thereto two new subsections which shall read as follows:

      "(d)    Temporary employees who have rendered less than two years of continuous service shall be entitled to a number of days of maternity leave with pay based on the ratio of thirty days of maternity leave to two years of continuous service.

      "(e)    Temporary employees, who passed civil service examinations given before the date of the application for maternity leave but the result of which examinations were released after such date of application, shall be entitled to the maternity leave granted to regular employees as of the date when said examinations were given."

Section 2.    Such sums as are necessary to carry into effect the provisions of this Act are authorized to be appropriated, out of any funds in the National Treasury not otherwise appropriated, to carry into effect the provisions of this Act.

Section 3.    This Act shall take effect as of June sixteen, nineteen hundred and fifty-one.


The Revised Penal Codes Act No. 3815
Act No. 3815
The Revised Penal Code

Article 1. Time when Act takes effect. - This Code shall take effect on the first day of January, nineteen hundred and thirty-two.

Article 2. Application of its provisions. - Except as provided in the treaties and laws of preferential application, the provisions of this Code shall be enforced not only within the Philippine Archipelago, including its atmosphere, its interior waters and maritime zone, but also outside of its jurisdiction, against those who:
     1. Should commit an offense while on a Philippine ship or airship;
     2. Should forge or counterfeit any coin or currency note of the Philippine Islands or obligations and securities issued by the Government of the Philippine Islands;
     3. Should be liable for acts connected with the introduction into these islands of the obligations and securities mentioned in the preceding number;
     4. While being public officers or employees, should commit an offense in the exercise of their functions; or
     5. Should commit any of the crimes against national security and the law of nations, defined in Title One of Book Two of this Code.


Magna Carta of Women
Republic Act 9710

The MCW is a comprehensive women's human rights law that seeks to eliminate discrimination through the recognition, protection, fulfilment and promotion of the rights of Filipino women, especially those belonging in the marginalized sectors of the society. It conveys a framework of rights for women based directly on international law.

The MCW establishes the Philippine government’s pledge of commitment to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women's (CEDAW) Committee in its 36th Session in 2006 and to the UN Human Rights Council on its first Universal Periodic Review in 2009. It is the local translation of the provisions of the CEDAW, particularly in defining gender discrimination, state obligations, substantive equality, and temporary special measures. It also recognizes human rights guaranteed by the international Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR).


Republic Act 679

AN ACT TO REGULATE THE EMPLOYMENT OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN, TO PROVIDE PENALTIES FOR VIOLATION HEREOF, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES

Section 1. Employment of children below fourteen years of age. —

     (a) Children below fourteen years of age may only be employed to perform light work —
             (1)   which is not harmful to their health or normal development, and
             (2)   which is not such as to prejudice their attendance in school or to benefit from the instruction there given.

       (b) No child below fourteen years of age shall be employed or permitted or suffered to work on school days in any shop, factory, commercial, industrial, or agricultural establishment or any other place of labor unless such child knows how to read and write. The fact that a child knows how to read and write shall be evidenced by an educational certificate issued by the principal of the public or private elementary school in the locality where such child resides; but in case the child cannot produce said certificate, the managing employer of the establishment concerned shall conduct an intelligence test to determine whether the child can read or write.


Violence against women (VAW)

Violence against women (VAW) appears as one of the country’s pervasive social problems. According to the 2008 National Demographic and Health Survey conducted by the National Statistics Office, one in five Filipino women age 15-49 has experienced physical violence since age 15. It is indeed alarming that despite efforts to address the concern, VAW persists.

VAW is deemed to be closely linked with the unequal power relationship between women and men otherwise known as “gender?based violence.”Societal norms and traditions dictate people to think men are the leaders, pursuers, providers, and take on dominant roles in society while women are nurturers, men’s companions and supporters, and take on subordinate roles in society. This perception leads to men gaining more power over women. With power comes the need to control to retain that power. And VAW is a form of men’s expression of controlling women to retain power.

Women are also put to blame as the cause of their own misery. In the home, some women are accused of being “naggers” or neglectful of their duties as wife that is why they are beaten by their spouses. Rape is sometimes attributed to a raped woman’s “flirtatious” ways. A woman filing for sexual harassment, in some instances is blamed for being malicious by interpreting her employer’s appreciation of her good looks.